neurodivergent person being productive
January 11, 2024

Productivity methods for the neurodivergent - pros & cons

We explore 5 common productivity methods through a Neurodivergent lens

Lydia Wilkins

Lydia Wilkins is a freelance journalist specialising in disability and social inequality issues. She is the author of The Autism Friendly Cookbook.

No items found.

When we think about productivity, we often think of ourselves in terms of the word ‘busy’, because this is seen in some circles as being successful. The freelance writer Sian Meades Williams, who has just released the long awaited The Pyjama Myth, has several passages in the book about this very subject; Emma Gannon has also analysed the impact of things such as office environments and set ups on our productivity too. However, we do very often fail to take into account that productivity - which much of our working lives is devoted to - can differ from individual to individual.

If you are Neurodivergent, you might find that having to work in certain environments is extremely hard and stressful, especially if you have Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD) You may well experience other challenges that impact productivity, such as executive functioning. This can make the sequencing of tasks, as well as starting and finishing them, quite difficult.

Everyone is different and has different needs and different ways of completing tasks. That being said, while there is often a lot of discussions of productivity methods, very few take into account how suitable they are from a Neurodivergent perspective. We hope this list gives you some ideas on whether these methods could work for you.

The Pomodoro Technique

You may have seen a few freelancers on social media recently speaking to how great this method can be! In essence, you choose the task you need to complete; set a time limit of 25 minutes. Work until the timer has finished, and take a break for 5 minutes. Complete four sets, and then have a longer break! You can find a premade Pomodoro routine in the Tiimo App.

pomodoro_app

Pros: The Pomodoro Technique is particularly beneficial during periods of hyperfocus, acting as an effective tool to set healthy time boundaries. Hyperfocusing, while productive, can lead to overlooking basic self-care like eating or taking bathroom breaks. This method serves as a crucial reminder to allocate time for essential personal care.

Cons: The 25-minute work interval might feel extensive for some individuals. If you find that shorter work periods enhance your productivity, exploring alternatives to the Pomodoro Technique could be more suitable.

Bullet Journalling

The bullet journal method was actually created by someone who is Neurodivergent! (Bet you didn’t expect that!) This is a method used to catalogue information in a notebook, in order to plot the future and the present. This is the practice of mindfulness, wrapped up as a system to help you be organised and live your most productive life! And it doesn’t have to be that elaborate, either.

Pros: The beauty of the Bullet Journal method lies in its adaptability; it's entirely up to you. While it follows some basic principles for information organization, it's highly individualized for each user. Simple in its requirements, you just need a pen, a notebook, and perhaps a ruler. It's flexible in terms of time investment and also considers the challenges of executive functioning.

Cons: The Bullet Journal approach may require time before its benefits become apparent, and some may find its structure a bit rigid. From personal experience, I switched back to a Filofax, as I found Bullet Journaling challenging. Additionally, there's a tendency to focus more on crafting aesthetically pleasing journal layouts rather than on the actual tasks at hand.

Visual Prompts

Visual prompts are exactly what they sound like: using things you can see to remind you to do something or help you function better. For example, you might stick a list of daily tasks on your bedroom wall, put your weekly meal plan on the fridge, or keep a notepad by your bed to jot down morning reminders.

Pros: This method is really helpful if you tend to forget things, which can happen for those who are Neurodivergent. Putting these visual reminders in places where you spend a lot of time, like your bedroom or living room, can make a big difference. Since everyone's memory works differently, having these visual cues can be a big help.

Cons: However, this approach does require you to follow through with what the prompts tell you. If you find it hard to maintain a routine or organize tasks in order, this might be challenging. One way to make it easier is to write out your daily plan, including specific times and places for activities like meals, and stick it somewhere you'll see it often.

The SMART goals method

The SMART goals method is an effective approach for setting goals, particularly useful for detailed and structured planning. It stands for Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant, and Time-bound. This method involves defining your goal with precision, ensuring it's quantifiable, realistic, pertinent to your objectives, and set within a defined timeframe. This structured approach helps in breaking down larger goals into manageable steps, making it easier to focus and track progress.

Pros:

  1. Ideal for Independent Projects: For those working independently or managing their own businesses, the SMART goals framework offers a clear roadmap. It's especially beneficial for Neurodivergent individuals who thrive with structure and clear objectives.
  2. Facilitates Long-Term Planning: This method is excellent for long-term projects, helping to lay out a step-by-step plan towards achieving complex goals.
  3. Enhances Focus and Clarity: By defining specific and measurable goals, it becomes easier to concentrate on the task at hand, reducing ambiguity and increasing productivity.
  4. Encourages Realistic Goal Setting: The framework ensures that goals are achievable and relevant, fostering a sense of accomplishment as these are gradually met.

Cons:

  1. Limited Flexibility: The structured nature of SMART goals can sometimes be too rigid, leaving little room for adaptability when circumstances change or when a different approach becomes necessary.
  2. Potential Overemphasis on Planning: There's a risk of spending too much time in the planning phase, especially for those who might struggle with executive functioning. This over-planning can detract from actual productive work.
  3. Challenges in Measuring Certain Goals: Some goals, particularly those related to personal growth or creativity, might be hard to quantify, making the 'Measurable' aspect challenging to apply.
  4. Risk of Overwhelm: For individuals who are prone to feeling overwhelmed, the detailed and specific nature of this method might add to stress, especially if goals are set too high or too ambitious.

The SMART goals method, while beneficial in many respects, requires a balanced approach. It's important to remain flexible and adjust your goals as needed. This method can be particularly advantageous for those who benefit from a structured approach to planning and task execution. However, it's crucial to be mindful of the potential drawbacks, such as rigidity and the temptation to focus too much on planning at the expense of action. For Neurodivergent individuals, adapting this method to suit personal needs and working styles can make it a valuable tool for achieving both short-term and long-term objectives.

The Use of Planners

In today's fast-paced world, it seems like everyone uses a planner. The market is flooded with options, ranging from the Passion Planner and Filofax to the classic appointment diary. These planners come in various formats and styles, each designed to cater to different planning needs and preferences. They can be a crucial tool in managing your daily life, keeping track of appointments, and setting goals.

Pros:

  1. Diversity of Choices: With such a variety of planners available, there’s something for everyone. Whether you need something for detailed project planning or just a simple layout for daily tasks, there’s a planner out there for you.
  2. Organizational Benefits: Planners help in sequencing tasks and information, which is particularly beneficial for those who struggle with organization or executive functioning. It’s like having a personal assistant to guide you through your day-to-day activities.
  3. Boosts Productivity: By having a tangible record of your tasks and appointments, you can more effectively manage your time and priorities, boosting overall productivity.
  4. Customization and Personalization: Many digital planner apps offer the ability to customize and personalize them, making the planning process more enjoyable and tailored to your specific needs.

Cons:

  1. Overwhelming Choices: The sheer number of options can be daunting. Choosing the right planner that suits your style and needs can be a time-consuming process.
  2. Setup Time: Depending on the complexity and features of the planner, setting it up for maximum productivity can be a lengthy process.
  3. Portability Issues: Being a physical item, a planner needs to be carried around, which can be inconvenient at times. Also, in a world increasingly reliant on digital solutions, the physical nature of a planner might seem a bit outdated to some.
  4. Rigidity and Inflexibility: Updating or editing plans can be cumbersome, especially when your schedules or priorities shift unexpectedly.

Everyone's needs and preferences vary greatly, so you might find that certain productivity methods work better for you than others. It may also depend on the nature of the task at hand. For instance, the Pomodoro Technique might be great for getting through household chores, while the SMART method could be more effective for tracking long-term goals.

Experiment with different methods and combinations to find what suits you best. Share your experiences with us in the comments on our Instagram or Twitter posts. But remember, productivity isn't a constant state. It’s perfectly normal to have 'off' days, weeks, or even longer periods. It’s important to recognize and accept these fluctuations as part of your productivity journey.

Lydia is an Autistic UK-based journalist. She is particularly passionate about disability and social justice issues. She is also the author of the Autism Friendly cook book which will be out in November 2022. You can find her blog and newsletter here

Daily planning designed to change your life.

Visualize time. Build focus. Make life happen. Tiimo is designed for people with ADHD, Autism, and everyone who thinks, works, and plans differently.

Get started with our free trial. Cancel anytime.

January 11, 2024

Productivity methods for the neurodivergent - pros & cons

We explore 5 common productivity methods through a Neurodivergent lens

Lydia Wilkins

Lydia Wilkins is a freelance journalist specialising in disability and social inequality issues. She is the author of The Autism Friendly Cookbook.

No items found.

When we think about productivity, we often think of ourselves in terms of the word ‘busy’, because this is seen in some circles as being successful. The freelance writer Sian Meades Williams, who has just released the long awaited The Pyjama Myth, has several passages in the book about this very subject; Emma Gannon has also analysed the impact of things such as office environments and set ups on our productivity too. However, we do very often fail to take into account that productivity - which much of our working lives is devoted to - can differ from individual to individual.

If you are Neurodivergent, you might find that having to work in certain environments is extremely hard and stressful, especially if you have Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD) You may well experience other challenges that impact productivity, such as executive functioning. This can make the sequencing of tasks, as well as starting and finishing them, quite difficult.

Everyone is different and has different needs and different ways of completing tasks. That being said, while there is often a lot of discussions of productivity methods, very few take into account how suitable they are from a Neurodivergent perspective. We hope this list gives you some ideas on whether these methods could work for you.

The Pomodoro Technique

You may have seen a few freelancers on social media recently speaking to how great this method can be! In essence, you choose the task you need to complete; set a time limit of 25 minutes. Work until the timer has finished, and take a break for 5 minutes. Complete four sets, and then have a longer break! You can find a premade Pomodoro routine in the Tiimo App.

pomodoro_app

Pros: The Pomodoro Technique is particularly beneficial during periods of hyperfocus, acting as an effective tool to set healthy time boundaries. Hyperfocusing, while productive, can lead to overlooking basic self-care like eating or taking bathroom breaks. This method serves as a crucial reminder to allocate time for essential personal care.

Cons: The 25-minute work interval might feel extensive for some individuals. If you find that shorter work periods enhance your productivity, exploring alternatives to the Pomodoro Technique could be more suitable.

Bullet Journalling

The bullet journal method was actually created by someone who is Neurodivergent! (Bet you didn’t expect that!) This is a method used to catalogue information in a notebook, in order to plot the future and the present. This is the practice of mindfulness, wrapped up as a system to help you be organised and live your most productive life! And it doesn’t have to be that elaborate, either.

Pros: The beauty of the Bullet Journal method lies in its adaptability; it's entirely up to you. While it follows some basic principles for information organization, it's highly individualized for each user. Simple in its requirements, you just need a pen, a notebook, and perhaps a ruler. It's flexible in terms of time investment and also considers the challenges of executive functioning.

Cons: The Bullet Journal approach may require time before its benefits become apparent, and some may find its structure a bit rigid. From personal experience, I switched back to a Filofax, as I found Bullet Journaling challenging. Additionally, there's a tendency to focus more on crafting aesthetically pleasing journal layouts rather than on the actual tasks at hand.

Visual Prompts

Visual prompts are exactly what they sound like: using things you can see to remind you to do something or help you function better. For example, you might stick a list of daily tasks on your bedroom wall, put your weekly meal plan on the fridge, or keep a notepad by your bed to jot down morning reminders.

Pros: This method is really helpful if you tend to forget things, which can happen for those who are Neurodivergent. Putting these visual reminders in places where you spend a lot of time, like your bedroom or living room, can make a big difference. Since everyone's memory works differently, having these visual cues can be a big help.

Cons: However, this approach does require you to follow through with what the prompts tell you. If you find it hard to maintain a routine or organize tasks in order, this might be challenging. One way to make it easier is to write out your daily plan, including specific times and places for activities like meals, and stick it somewhere you'll see it often.

The SMART goals method

The SMART goals method is an effective approach for setting goals, particularly useful for detailed and structured planning. It stands for Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant, and Time-bound. This method involves defining your goal with precision, ensuring it's quantifiable, realistic, pertinent to your objectives, and set within a defined timeframe. This structured approach helps in breaking down larger goals into manageable steps, making it easier to focus and track progress.

Pros:

  1. Ideal for Independent Projects: For those working independently or managing their own businesses, the SMART goals framework offers a clear roadmap. It's especially beneficial for Neurodivergent individuals who thrive with structure and clear objectives.
  2. Facilitates Long-Term Planning: This method is excellent for long-term projects, helping to lay out a step-by-step plan towards achieving complex goals.
  3. Enhances Focus and Clarity: By defining specific and measurable goals, it becomes easier to concentrate on the task at hand, reducing ambiguity and increasing productivity.
  4. Encourages Realistic Goal Setting: The framework ensures that goals are achievable and relevant, fostering a sense of accomplishment as these are gradually met.

Cons:

  1. Limited Flexibility: The structured nature of SMART goals can sometimes be too rigid, leaving little room for adaptability when circumstances change or when a different approach becomes necessary.
  2. Potential Overemphasis on Planning: There's a risk of spending too much time in the planning phase, especially for those who might struggle with executive functioning. This over-planning can detract from actual productive work.
  3. Challenges in Measuring Certain Goals: Some goals, particularly those related to personal growth or creativity, might be hard to quantify, making the 'Measurable' aspect challenging to apply.
  4. Risk of Overwhelm: For individuals who are prone to feeling overwhelmed, the detailed and specific nature of this method might add to stress, especially if goals are set too high or too ambitious.

The SMART goals method, while beneficial in many respects, requires a balanced approach. It's important to remain flexible and adjust your goals as needed. This method can be particularly advantageous for those who benefit from a structured approach to planning and task execution. However, it's crucial to be mindful of the potential drawbacks, such as rigidity and the temptation to focus too much on planning at the expense of action. For Neurodivergent individuals, adapting this method to suit personal needs and working styles can make it a valuable tool for achieving both short-term and long-term objectives.

The Use of Planners

In today's fast-paced world, it seems like everyone uses a planner. The market is flooded with options, ranging from the Passion Planner and Filofax to the classic appointment diary. These planners come in various formats and styles, each designed to cater to different planning needs and preferences. They can be a crucial tool in managing your daily life, keeping track of appointments, and setting goals.

Pros:

  1. Diversity of Choices: With such a variety of planners available, there’s something for everyone. Whether you need something for detailed project planning or just a simple layout for daily tasks, there’s a planner out there for you.
  2. Organizational Benefits: Planners help in sequencing tasks and information, which is particularly beneficial for those who struggle with organization or executive functioning. It’s like having a personal assistant to guide you through your day-to-day activities.
  3. Boosts Productivity: By having a tangible record of your tasks and appointments, you can more effectively manage your time and priorities, boosting overall productivity.
  4. Customization and Personalization: Many digital planner apps offer the ability to customize and personalize them, making the planning process more enjoyable and tailored to your specific needs.

Cons:

  1. Overwhelming Choices: The sheer number of options can be daunting. Choosing the right planner that suits your style and needs can be a time-consuming process.
  2. Setup Time: Depending on the complexity and features of the planner, setting it up for maximum productivity can be a lengthy process.
  3. Portability Issues: Being a physical item, a planner needs to be carried around, which can be inconvenient at times. Also, in a world increasingly reliant on digital solutions, the physical nature of a planner might seem a bit outdated to some.
  4. Rigidity and Inflexibility: Updating or editing plans can be cumbersome, especially when your schedules or priorities shift unexpectedly.

Everyone's needs and preferences vary greatly, so you might find that certain productivity methods work better for you than others. It may also depend on the nature of the task at hand. For instance, the Pomodoro Technique might be great for getting through household chores, while the SMART method could be more effective for tracking long-term goals.

Experiment with different methods and combinations to find what suits you best. Share your experiences with us in the comments on our Instagram or Twitter posts. But remember, productivity isn't a constant state. It’s perfectly normal to have 'off' days, weeks, or even longer periods. It’s important to recognize and accept these fluctuations as part of your productivity journey.

Lydia is an Autistic UK-based journalist. She is particularly passionate about disability and social justice issues. She is also the author of the Autism Friendly cook book which will be out in November 2022. You can find her blog and newsletter here

Daily planning designed to change your life.

Visualize time. Build focus. Make life happen. Tiimo is designed for people with ADHD, Autism, and everyone who thinks, works, and plans differently.

Get started with our free trial. Cancel anytime.

Productivity methods for the neurodivergent - pros & cons
January 11, 2024

Productivity methods for the neurodivergent - pros & cons

We explore 5 common productivity methods through a Neurodivergent lens

Georgina Shute

Georgina is an ADHD coach and digital leader. She set up KindTwo to empower as many people as possible to work with Neurodiversity - not against it.

No items found.

When we think about productivity, we often think of ourselves in terms of the word ‘busy’, because this is seen in some circles as being successful. The freelance writer Sian Meades Williams, who has just released the long awaited The Pyjama Myth, has several passages in the book about this very subject; Emma Gannon has also analysed the impact of things such as office environments and set ups on our productivity too. However, we do very often fail to take into account that productivity - which much of our working lives is devoted to - can differ from individual to individual.

If you are Neurodivergent, you might find that having to work in certain environments is extremely hard and stressful, especially if you have Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD) You may well experience other challenges that impact productivity, such as executive functioning. This can make the sequencing of tasks, as well as starting and finishing them, quite difficult.

Everyone is different and has different needs and different ways of completing tasks. That being said, while there is often a lot of discussions of productivity methods, very few take into account how suitable they are from a Neurodivergent perspective. We hope this list gives you some ideas on whether these methods could work for you.

The Pomodoro Technique

You may have seen a few freelancers on social media recently speaking to how great this method can be! In essence, you choose the task you need to complete; set a time limit of 25 minutes. Work until the timer has finished, and take a break for 5 minutes. Complete four sets, and then have a longer break! You can find a premade Pomodoro routine in the Tiimo App.

pomodoro_app

Pros: The Pomodoro Technique is particularly beneficial during periods of hyperfocus, acting as an effective tool to set healthy time boundaries. Hyperfocusing, while productive, can lead to overlooking basic self-care like eating or taking bathroom breaks. This method serves as a crucial reminder to allocate time for essential personal care.

Cons: The 25-minute work interval might feel extensive for some individuals. If you find that shorter work periods enhance your productivity, exploring alternatives to the Pomodoro Technique could be more suitable.

Bullet Journalling

The bullet journal method was actually created by someone who is Neurodivergent! (Bet you didn’t expect that!) This is a method used to catalogue information in a notebook, in order to plot the future and the present. This is the practice of mindfulness, wrapped up as a system to help you be organised and live your most productive life! And it doesn’t have to be that elaborate, either.

Pros: The beauty of the Bullet Journal method lies in its adaptability; it's entirely up to you. While it follows some basic principles for information organization, it's highly individualized for each user. Simple in its requirements, you just need a pen, a notebook, and perhaps a ruler. It's flexible in terms of time investment and also considers the challenges of executive functioning.

Cons: The Bullet Journal approach may require time before its benefits become apparent, and some may find its structure a bit rigid. From personal experience, I switched back to a Filofax, as I found Bullet Journaling challenging. Additionally, there's a tendency to focus more on crafting aesthetically pleasing journal layouts rather than on the actual tasks at hand.

Visual Prompts

Visual prompts are exactly what they sound like: using things you can see to remind you to do something or help you function better. For example, you might stick a list of daily tasks on your bedroom wall, put your weekly meal plan on the fridge, or keep a notepad by your bed to jot down morning reminders.

Pros: This method is really helpful if you tend to forget things, which can happen for those who are Neurodivergent. Putting these visual reminders in places where you spend a lot of time, like your bedroom or living room, can make a big difference. Since everyone's memory works differently, having these visual cues can be a big help.

Cons: However, this approach does require you to follow through with what the prompts tell you. If you find it hard to maintain a routine or organize tasks in order, this might be challenging. One way to make it easier is to write out your daily plan, including specific times and places for activities like meals, and stick it somewhere you'll see it often.

The SMART goals method

The SMART goals method is an effective approach for setting goals, particularly useful for detailed and structured planning. It stands for Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant, and Time-bound. This method involves defining your goal with precision, ensuring it's quantifiable, realistic, pertinent to your objectives, and set within a defined timeframe. This structured approach helps in breaking down larger goals into manageable steps, making it easier to focus and track progress.

Pros:

  1. Ideal for Independent Projects: For those working independently or managing their own businesses, the SMART goals framework offers a clear roadmap. It's especially beneficial for Neurodivergent individuals who thrive with structure and clear objectives.
  2. Facilitates Long-Term Planning: This method is excellent for long-term projects, helping to lay out a step-by-step plan towards achieving complex goals.
  3. Enhances Focus and Clarity: By defining specific and measurable goals, it becomes easier to concentrate on the task at hand, reducing ambiguity and increasing productivity.
  4. Encourages Realistic Goal Setting: The framework ensures that goals are achievable and relevant, fostering a sense of accomplishment as these are gradually met.

Cons:

  1. Limited Flexibility: The structured nature of SMART goals can sometimes be too rigid, leaving little room for adaptability when circumstances change or when a different approach becomes necessary.
  2. Potential Overemphasis on Planning: There's a risk of spending too much time in the planning phase, especially for those who might struggle with executive functioning. This over-planning can detract from actual productive work.
  3. Challenges in Measuring Certain Goals: Some goals, particularly those related to personal growth or creativity, might be hard to quantify, making the 'Measurable' aspect challenging to apply.
  4. Risk of Overwhelm: For individuals who are prone to feeling overwhelmed, the detailed and specific nature of this method might add to stress, especially if goals are set too high or too ambitious.

The SMART goals method, while beneficial in many respects, requires a balanced approach. It's important to remain flexible and adjust your goals as needed. This method can be particularly advantageous for those who benefit from a structured approach to planning and task execution. However, it's crucial to be mindful of the potential drawbacks, such as rigidity and the temptation to focus too much on planning at the expense of action. For Neurodivergent individuals, adapting this method to suit personal needs and working styles can make it a valuable tool for achieving both short-term and long-term objectives.

The Use of Planners

In today's fast-paced world, it seems like everyone uses a planner. The market is flooded with options, ranging from the Passion Planner and Filofax to the classic appointment diary. These planners come in various formats and styles, each designed to cater to different planning needs and preferences. They can be a crucial tool in managing your daily life, keeping track of appointments, and setting goals.

Pros:

  1. Diversity of Choices: With such a variety of planners available, there’s something for everyone. Whether you need something for detailed project planning or just a simple layout for daily tasks, there’s a planner out there for you.
  2. Organizational Benefits: Planners help in sequencing tasks and information, which is particularly beneficial for those who struggle with organization or executive functioning. It’s like having a personal assistant to guide you through your day-to-day activities.
  3. Boosts Productivity: By having a tangible record of your tasks and appointments, you can more effectively manage your time and priorities, boosting overall productivity.
  4. Customization and Personalization: Many digital planner apps offer the ability to customize and personalize them, making the planning process more enjoyable and tailored to your specific needs.

Cons:

  1. Overwhelming Choices: The sheer number of options can be daunting. Choosing the right planner that suits your style and needs can be a time-consuming process.
  2. Setup Time: Depending on the complexity and features of the planner, setting it up for maximum productivity can be a lengthy process.
  3. Portability Issues: Being a physical item, a planner needs to be carried around, which can be inconvenient at times. Also, in a world increasingly reliant on digital solutions, the physical nature of a planner might seem a bit outdated to some.
  4. Rigidity and Inflexibility: Updating or editing plans can be cumbersome, especially when your schedules or priorities shift unexpectedly.

Everyone's needs and preferences vary greatly, so you might find that certain productivity methods work better for you than others. It may also depend on the nature of the task at hand. For instance, the Pomodoro Technique might be great for getting through household chores, while the SMART method could be more effective for tracking long-term goals.

Experiment with different methods and combinations to find what suits you best. Share your experiences with us in the comments on our Instagram or Twitter posts. But remember, productivity isn't a constant state. It’s perfectly normal to have 'off' days, weeks, or even longer periods. It’s important to recognize and accept these fluctuations as part of your productivity journey.

Lydia is an Autistic UK-based journalist. She is particularly passionate about disability and social justice issues. She is also the author of the Autism Friendly cook book which will be out in November 2022. You can find her blog and newsletter here

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